The office of Church Administration exists to help church leaders be faithful stewards of church resources.


David Adams

Director, Church Administration & Special Projects


(214) 828-5253

Brittany Thomas

Ministry Assistant, Communications, Church Administration & Special Projects


(214) 828-5232

Have a question pertaining to Church Admin? We’d love to hear from you! Leave a message below and we will get in touch with you shortly.









Bylaws & Governance

A church’s constitution, bylaws, and policies are not static documents containing rules and limits. When well-used, they create a framework for healthy and productive relationships in the body of Christ. More information…

Personnel

Churches provide guidance and direction through personnel policies, job descriptions, and other resources, which support employees and volunteers living out their calling to serve God and others. More information…

Finances

Believers are responsible for investing earthly treasures in eternal pursuits. Texas Baptists store up treasures in heaven by handling money with wisdom and integrity. More information…

Properties

The buildings, furnishings, vehicles, and other physical property of a church are tools for ministry. Good stewardship of these resources is a reflection of our commitment to Christ and to serving our Texas communities. More information…

Cooperative Relationships

Individual congregations need other congregations to partner with them in accomplishing a mission that’s bigger than any single church. Explore ways to link up with other churches for common causes in Texas and beyond. More information…

Legal Issues

Many ministry concerns have legal implications. These include the safety and security of children, incorporation, hiring employees, maximizing religious liberties, tax status, and others. Pastors, administrators, and lay leaders will find helpful information here. More information…

Risk Management

Risk is a part of everyday life?you can’t hide from it or avoid it completely. But churches can minimize risk with adequate insurance, policies, and practices. More information…

Communications & Technology

It’s our calling to make disciples in the 21 st century. Effective teaching, preaching, and ministering require clear communication using effective tools. More information…

Strategic Planning

Forward-thinking churches trust the Spirit to guide them as they plan for the future. Use these tools to plan and carry out the work of Christ in your church’s sphere of influence. More information…

Volunteers

Every believer is a minister, so enlisting, screening, and equipping volunteers are at the heart of a church’s work. Wise church leaders invest heavily in developing members for service. More information…

FAQs

I heard churches can no longer use Premium Reimbursement Plans for employee health insurance. What does this mean?

What should my church be doing about same-sex marriage? What should we put in our bylaws?

Our church does background checks for all employees and volunteers who work with children, should we be doing anything else?

Where can I find sample job descriptions for church staff?

Are there job description samples for common church committees? Also, how do I help committee members know how to do their job better?

Our church personnel committee wants to be sure we are paying our pastor and staff in line with other churches like ours. How can we find out what is reasonable for salary and benefits?

Do churches have to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)? Isn’t there a ministerial exception?

Should our church be incorporated?


Q: I heard churches can no longer use Premium Reimbursement Plans for employee health insurance. What does this mean?


A: For many years, churches have been able to directly pay for, or reimburse ministers and other church employees for, the premiums of health insurance policies purchased by the employee without the employee being taxed. As a result of regulations governing the Affordable Care Act ( ACA), this will ? in most cases ? no longer be allowed effective July 1, 2015.

If you allow this practice (called Premium Reimbursement Plans) to continue after June 30, your church could be subject to a penalty under the ACA of $100.00 per day per participating employee. That could add up to an annual maximum penalty of $36,500.00 a year per participating employee!

That’s the bad news. But there are some clarifications and suggestions on ways to deal with this new provision of the law so that you can avoid the penalties and still maintain the health care coverage that you want to provide for your employees. Please read the blog by Rollie Richmond and Jim Reed for additional help.

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Q: What should my church be doing about same-sex marriage? What should we put in our bylaws?


A: (Note: This information is not to be considered legal advice, as your church should consult with its own attorney.) If your church chooses to adopt provisions related to same-sex marriage, the best location for them may be in the “Statement of Religious Beliefs” section of the bylaws. The following is only suggested language and each church is encouraged to amend or edit the provisions to reflect the position of your church. It is critical that any language your church includes in the bylaws is enforced uniformly.

Suggested sample bylaw language:

Marriage ? Marriage is a biblical institution established by God as described by Scripture. We believe biblical marriage can only occur between one man and one woman. This church recognizes that marriage is the uniting of one man and one woman in covenant commitment. Accordingly, this church’s pastors and staff will not officiate in same-sex unions or same-sex marriages, nor will its property or resources be used for such purposes.

Human Sexuality ? The Bible teaches that legitimate sexual relations are exercised solely within marriage between a man and woman. Hence, this Church opposes all forms of sexual immorality, including premarital sex, extramarital behavior, homosexual behavior, and pornography.

Please review our guideline for preparing your church for other aspects your church should consider.

Remember that bylaw language defining marriage in the biblical sense doesn’t mean that the church is immune from a lawsuit or complaint, but it reduces the likelihood of a lawsuit or complaint and places the church in a much better legal position should a lawsuit be filed.

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Q: Our church does background checks for all employees and volunteers who work with children, should we be doing anything else?


A: See the blog post Child Abuse is Everyone’s Business. Every church should adopt a child and youth safety and protection policy. Click here to view a sample policy.

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Q: Where can I find sample job descriptions for church staff?


A: For a list of sample job descriptions, click here.

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Q: Are there job description samples for common church committees? Also, how do I help committee members know how to do their job better?


A: For a list of sample job descriptions of common church committees, click here.

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Q: Our church personnel committee wants to be sure we are paying our pastor and staff in line with other churches like ours. How can we find out what is reasonable for salary and benefits?


A: Salary surveys are published regularly. However, there is much more to the stewardship of staff compensation than determining a reasonable amount. Personnel committees should take the time necessary to find out how to best take care of the interests of both staff and church before setting compensation, regardless of church size or the number of staff. Here are four good resources for your committee

  • Guidestone Financial Resources has a webpage with resources for Designing an employee benefits package. There you will also find their Compensation Survey results compiled in cooperation with LifeWay Christian Resources. (NOTE: This survey may not have a large enough sample size for some staff positions to be judged fairly.)
  • The Church Network (formerly National Association of Church Business Administrators) also publishes a highly regarded ministry salaries survey which typically has a much larger sample.
  • The Church Law & Tax website also provides helpful resources for planning staff compensation, including a Compensation Handbook for Church Staff.
  • Larger churches may find the Leadership Network salary report helpful.

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Q: Do churches have to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)? Isn’t there a ministerial exception?


A: Yes, churches must comply with FLSA, and yes, there is a ministerial exception. This exception exempts anyone who performs ministerial type duties for the church.

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Q: Should our church be incorporated?


A: There are benefits to a church being incorporated. However, some of the legal protection once given only to corporations now extends to unincorporated entities as well. Starting in 2006, the Texas Business Organizations code included Chapter 252 which covers unincorporated non-profit associations.

The goal of the law is to provide some of the same legal protections enjoyed by corporations to unincorporated nonprofits. This means that even if your church remains unincorporated it should be able to own, transfer, and sell property. It also means that the church can sue and be sued and that in most instances individual church members won’t be legally liable for the actions of the church.

A common argument from those opposed to church incorporation is that being recognized by the State creates entanglement with the State. The truth is that unincorporated churches are already subject to state regulation regardless of whether they choose to incorporate. Section 252.010 requires all unincorporated nonprofit associations to keep books and records that are available to the association’s members and also to the Texas Attorney General.

While Chapter 252 is intended to protect churches that choose not to incorporate, the law is relatively new and there is not much Court precedent applying the law. Incorporated churches are on more certain legal footing.

Additionally, many outside organizations (including financial institutions) prefer to deal with corporations and not with nonprofit associations.

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