DavidandGoliath

Tell me the stories of Jesus

August 8th, 2013 at 8:00 am

On Friday, we taught Religion class and I was designated “narrator” of the story of David and Goliath while Ashley “played” David and Taylor, Goliath.  (Note: I learned after getting some funny faces it is pronounced Go-lee-ath in Kenya!) It really is rather convenient when telling the story of the little shepherd boy David and the giant Goliath to have team members who are a foot apart in height! We learned that “God is BIG” and “God is STRONG” (with VBS-like actions of course) and I wrote a simple song the night before that tells how we praise God by dancing, praying, waving, playing instruments, etc. We sang while the children did the actions. I wasn’t sure if the teachers liked our lesson, but at the end they told us, “Very good! Now the children will never forget the story of David and Go-lee-ath!”

We returned Sunday to Mudoma Baptist Church and taught Sunday school. After much discussion on what to teach, we settled on the story of salvation. I was the narrator and it was incredibly fun to tell this story as I felt God’s nearness, taking away my nerves and giving me a special clarity of thought and speech.

We then made bracelets with plastic beads representing our salvation through Jesus: Green = creation, Black = sin, Red=blood, etc. It was so fun to see the children’s excitement as we tied the beads around their little necks and wrists.

Our NGO Peter then brought a message to the children. He stood up and began to preach, and I have never heard such a powerful account of the salvation of Jesus Christ – ever. And, I was also stunned. Peter had actually planned independently to teach the story of salvation. We had no idea he was even preaching when we planned our lesson! Afterwards Peter said, “Isn’t it amazing how the Holy Spirit works? That we choose the same topic for the same day! Thank you for laying the foundation for my lesson.”

During Peter’s message, I was thinking of how the word “different” has infiltrated my team’s vocabulary recently. We really like America, and we really have come to like Africa too! But nothing is quite the same! The sprite is not bad…just different! We order fish in America…but it’s not proper to dig in with our hands! We eat chicken, we just don’t normally drive 12 hours in the car with one before we eat it!

But as I listened to Peter preach and thought about these differences, I realized that in this world only ONE thing is truly NOT different. It is Jesus. He is the thread that that ties all of of humanity together. In this sea of differences, the words from Peter’s mouth today were resoundingly the same words I heard all of my life. There was no difference. And it’s comforting to know that no matter where I go, the story of Jesus is still the same.

By Christina Hagan, who served in Kenya this summer through Buckner’s Project Go! program. Project Go! volunteers travel all over the world and dedicate one or two months of their summer to minister to orphan children, caregivers, in-country staff, and short-term mission trip groups. Portions of this post originally appeared in Christina’s blog at  http://christinainkenya.blogspot.com/.

Are you looking for a place to serve? You can find mission opportunities like the ones available through Project Go! on Be On Mission. You may also toggle between Open, Ongoing and Completed projects on the map by using the color pins above the search tool.

Be On Mission is an online global missions locator that allows users to Search, Submit, and Share about mission opportunities around the world. To learn more about Be On Mission, contact beonmission@texasbaptists.org.

 

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