h1-arrowSubstance Abuse Updatesh1-arrow

Default star image

The end of school brings about many fun events for high school students and produces many happy memories.  Unfortunately, with prom, graduation and end of the year parties many students and families face pain and even tragedy when a fun event has an unwanted ending.  There are things that parents, youth ministers and caring adults can do to help the students make good choices and in turn life long memories.

It is important that parents and youth leaders clearly communicate to students the expectations, values and Christian principles that need to shape their decision making and actions.  In reality, peer pressure can be both positive and negative.  The end of school is a great time for students to make a stand for their values and faith by having a Christ-like response to their peers.  If a student has at least two other friends, who will stand with him or her then it is much easier to make a choice not to drink or do drugs.

The big events at the end of school also provide opportunities for churches to provide after party events where a safe environment and sponsors can be provided.

Equally important is that parents help their student make plans for the events with a structure that provides a fun but safe atmosphere and accountability with peers, leaders and parents.  Plans for events need to be agreed to and followed through with.  These plans need to include a budget that is realistic and where the student helps with the costs of the date and event.  With proper planning hopefully parents can ensure that the memories will produce smiles and laughter for years to come.

Default star image


An important part of any substance abuse ministry in a church is the connections to the community and other organizations that are involved in prevention and education events.  One of the partners of our state substance abuse ministry is Texans Standing Tall.  This group addresses prevention and education issues relating to adolescents and the use of alcohol, tobacco and drugs.  Texans Standing Tall hosts regional forums throughout the state for the purpose equipping and providing information and resources to community leaders and groups.   The forums are an excellent way to network and get relevant information about what the current needs are in your community.

2010 Dates and Locations are:

March 26-San Antonio
Education Service Center, Region 20
1314 Hines Avenue; San Antonio, TX 78208
Directions

April 22-Midland
Region 18 Building
2811 La Force Blvd.; Midland, TX 79711
Directions

Date TBA- Austin
Seton Administration Office Auditorium, 1st Floor
1345 Philomena Street; Austin, TX 78723
Directions

May 14-Amarillo
Education Service Center, Region 16
5800 Bell Street; Amarillo, TX 79109-6230
Directions

Date TBA- Dallas
College Student Forum

For more information about Texans Standing Tall or the Regional Forums, just check out their web page at www.texansstandingtall.org.

We value your input and suggestions.
Your comments and recommended resources are welcome in the comments box below.

Default star image

On July 6, 2009, the Washington Times had an interesting article about the importance of family dinners and adolescents.  It seems that the practice of eating dinner together as a family could be the single greatest decision that one can make toward saving the adolescents from poor decisions regarding drugs and alcohol.

For more than a decade, the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University (http://www.casacolumbia.org/templates/Home.aspx?articleid=287&zoneid=32) has been studying the tremendous impact that family meals can have on children. Their research repeatedly shows how children suffer when they don’t spend regular, casual time with their parents gathered around the dinner table. Consider this summary of their findings:

“Compared with teens who frequently had dinner with their families [five nights or more per week], those who had dinner with their families only two nights per week or less were twice as likely to be involved in substance abuse. They were 2.5 times as likely to drink alcohol, and nearly three times as likely to try marijuana.”

Dining together makes huge differences in general family relationships, too. Children from families who don’t have frequent meals together are more than twice as likely to say that their family has strained or tense relationships. And, sadly, they often don’t feel as if their parents are very interested in their lives.

How to save your family from being disconnected
There’s no reason to wonder if lonely meals lead to strained relationships or vice versa – find out by making togetherness a priority. “Just do it.” It might be a worn-out phrase, but as the parent, you need to determine in your heart to make family dinners happen.

And, although they won’t tell you, your teens want you to make it a priority…Really!

As the school year approaches, please consider making Recovery Sunday, October 18 a part of your church calendar for the fall.

Do Something: Substance Abuse Ministry DVD

Introducing Do Something: A Substance Abuse Ministry DVD available through the Christian Life Commission. To order, contact Alicia Enriquez at 214.828.5192, or e-mail alicia.enriquez@bgct.org. The cost is $2.

Pathways to Prevention Website
www.hazelden.org

We value your input and suggestions.
Your comments and recommended resources are welcome in the comments box below.

Default star image

“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.”

The serenity prayer is composed of wise words that challenge so many.  These are stressful days which provide unique challenges for men and women struggling with addictions.  The church can support, encourage and lead the way in changing part of the world beginning in your own neighborhood. Recovery Sunday is five months away but it’s time to begin to pray about making a stand in your community and congregation on October 18, 2009.  I encourage you to begin to accept the challenge to make a difference and pray for wisdom in the way to communicate Christ-like care and concern to your part of the world.  During the summer, we will be providing helps for your church in preparing for Recovery Sunday.

Do Something: Substance Abuse Ministry DVD

Introducing Do Something: A Substance Abuse Ministry DVD available through the Christian Life Commission. To order, contact Alicia Enriquez at 214.828.5192, or e-mail Alicia Enriquez. The cost is $2.

Pathways to PreventionWebsite

We value your input and suggestions.
Your comments and recommended resources are welcome in the comments box below.

Default star image


Important Note:  The Substance Abuse Ministry Training conference originally scheduled for Friday, May 1 has been rescheduled for the fall.  We will announce a new date for the conference in the next month.

When parents in your community think about safeguarding their teens from drugs, they usually think of illicit street drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine.  But today teens are abusing prescription drugs more than any illicit drug except marijuana.

The statistics on prescription drug abuse are startling: every day, more than 2,000 kids age 12 to 17 try a painkiller non-medically for the first time**, and 71 percent of persons age 12 and older who abuse these drugs say they get them from a relative or friend.  Perhaps most troubling is that many teens don’t realize these drugs can be just as dangerous as street drugs, so kids who would never try street drugs might feel safe abusing prescription drugs.  

Since the problem of prescription drug abuse is predominantly one of access and awareness, Family Circle magazine and the Media Campaign have joined forces to highlight the danger zones in each room of the home, producing a printed "house tour" that will run in the magazine’s June issue (on newsstands May 12).  Additional copies of this new resource – a supplement to the popular online version that can be found by visiting www.TheAntiDrug.com/dangerzones (Information from The Anti Drug Media campaign).

We value your input and suggestions.
Your comments and recommended resources are welcome in the comments box below.

Default star image


Addiction is a difficult disease.  It affects many people and the family members who love them.  There’s not an easy answer to recovery.  For most people, it’s a journey of therapy, group meetings, structured support and a walk with God.  Central to the 12 steps is the idea that the addict most turn their life over to God.  Recovery does not just happen; it takes a surrender to God and acknowledgement that one is trusting in Him to carry the load.

Recovery is also experienced through group work.  The following are some group resources that you can contact that can help folks struggling with addictions.

Celebrate Recovery:  www.celebraterecovery.com

AA-Alcoholics Anonymous:

      Austin:  512-444-0071

      Dallas:  214-887-6699

      Houston:  713-686-6300

NA-Narcotics Anonymous:  800-747-8972

Gamblers Anonymous:  888-424-3577

Sex/Love Addicts Anonymous:  800-477-8191

We are excited to announce that the Christian Life Commission Substance Abuse Ministry is now producing podcasts

      ::  Podcast

      ::  Other Resources

We value your input and suggestions.
Your comments and recommended resources are welcome in the comments box below.

Default star image

Substance Abuse UpdatesDecember is National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month.  The President has proclaimed the emphasis to help raise the awareness of the tragedies that result from driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

In his proclamation, President Bush stated, “Nearly 13,000 Americans died last year as a result of drunk driving. During the holidays, people are more likely to drive in an impaired state, and in order to better protect our citizens this holiday season, we must educate all Americans about the seriousness of this offense and its devastating consequences. Individuals across America can help prevent drunk and drugged driving by making responsible choices, identifying sober designated drivers, and educating young people about ways to avoid drunk and drugged driving. All Americans can work together to make our roads safer and help save lives by preventing others from driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs.”

The holidays are hopefully a time of happiness and cheer for your family.  However, it is important to understand the seriousness of drinking and driving and stop anyone around you from making this tragic choice.  Also it’s a good time to encourage and support those loved ones and friends who are in recovery to take it one day at a time and continue with their program of sobriety.

View substance abuse resources from the BGCT…

We value your input and suggestions.
Your comments and recommended resources are welcome in the comments box below.